Are kidney beans good for you?

Named for its resemblance to the kidney, this little bean is a great addition to your daily diet.

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Are kidney beans good for you?

Named for its resemblance to the kidney, this little bean is a great addition to your daily diet.

Like many of its bean brethren, the kidney bean is an excellent source of cholesterol-lowering fibre, with just one serving yielding almost half of your recommended intake of fibre. A high consumption of fibre can reduce the risk of heart failure and other coronary complaints.

The bean is also a powerhouse of the mineral molybdenum, which is a detoxifier of sulphites (preservatives found in wine and some food), with 177% of your recommended intake in a single serving. Furthermore, it has rich stores of iron and manganese, great for energy production, and its high complete protein content mean it is a viable substitute to red meat or chicken.

One point to note about kidney beans is their relatively high level of toxicity when compared to other beans. This means that they need to be cooked at a high temperature for at least ten minutes prior to eating to completely eradicate the toxins.

Is honey good for you?

Honey is a deliciously rich, golden syrup-like liquid. With around 80% of its composition coming from natural sugars, honey is very high in calories and as such should be used in moderation. Its caloric density is similar to that of refined sugar.

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Is honey good for you?

Honey is a deliciously rich, golden syrup-like liquid. With around 80% of its composition coming from natural sugars, honey is very high in calories and as such should be used in moderation. Its caloric density is similar to that of refined sugar.

Raw honey, which has not been heated or pastuerised is more nutrient rich than processed kinds. It may contain traces of pollen (and even bee wings!) but don’t let that put you off. It has powerful anti-oxidant, ant-bacterial and anti-fungal properties and is believed to stabalise blood sugar levels, calm nerves and treat ulcers.

Manuka honey in particular has strong anti-bacterial qualities as a result of its large quantity of methylglyoxal (MG), and can be used to treat open wounds.

 

Are grapefruits good for you?

The grapefruit is a subtropical citrus fruit, available in several varieties, including seeded and seedless, red, pink and white. Although it can be found in supermarkets all year round, the fruit is at its tart-sweet best in season between winter and spring.

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Are grapefruits good for you?

The grapefruit is a subtropical citrus fruit, available in several varieties, including seeded and seedless, red, pink and white. Although it can be found in supermarkets all year round, the fruit is at its tart-sweet best in season between winter and spring.

In addition to it’s delicious tangy taste the grapefruit also has a variety of health benefits. Packed with vitamin C (a single portion of grapefruit contains almost three-quarters of your recommended daily intake). As well as helping to prevent everyday complaints like the common cold, vitamin C also helps to reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer and strokes.

Grapefruits also contain pectin, making it a good source of dietary fibre, and the red and pink varieties contain the antioxidant lycopene, which is one of the best methods of fighting oxygen free-radicals (cell-damaging compounds).

Studies show that a balanced diet incorporating grapefruits leads to lower cholesterol and can improve the body’s metabolism by burning fat more effectively.

Is garlic good for you?

Garlic is part of the Allium family – its relatives include the onion, shallot and chive. The pungent herb has longed been used in both culinary and medicinal practices in cultures around the globe.

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Is garlic good for you?

Garlic is part of the Allium family – its relatives include the onion, shallot and chive. The pungent herb has longed been used in both culinary and medicinal practices in cultures around the globe.

As well as imparting delicious flavour to any dish (and warding off vampires of course!), garlic has significant health benefits. Packed with antioxidants, it’s a natural antibiotic and is also rich in vitamin C, which packs a punch when fighting off afflictions from the common cold to heart disease.

The presence of the sulphur-containing compound allicin (the source of garlic’s distinctive flavour) acts like an anticoagulent, preventing the clumping together of blood platelets. This reduces blood pressure and aids in preventing cardiovascular disease.

It’s worth noting that allicin is not found in whole garlic – the cloves needs to be crushed to stimulate the formation.

Are almonds good for you?

The almond nut is actually the seed from within the almond fruit. It can be eaten raw, chopped or roasted.

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Are almonds good for me?

The almond nut is actually the seed from within the almond fruit. It can be eaten raw, chopped or roasted.

Almonds are rich in health-promoting monounsaturated fats, that lower LDL (bad cholesterol) levels. They are an excellent source of protein (one cup contains 30g of protein), providing all nine essential amino acids. They also pack a high dose of Vitamin E, a strong anti-oxidant that neutralises free radicals that can develop in the body through natural environmental exposures such as cigarette smoke, air pollution, and the sun’s UV rays.

Almonds have an exceptionally low glycemic load of zero. This means that when eaten with foods of a higher GL value, they can help stablise your blood sugar level after a meal.

Are eggs good for you?

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? In terms of high-protein levels, it’s pretty much a dead heat. But eggs have other health benefits too.

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Are eggs good for you?

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? In terms of high-protein levels, it’s pretty much a dead heat. But eggs have other health benefits too.

Eggs are a source of ‘complete protein’, which means they contain all nine amino acids, essential in building and repairing muscle, tissue, hair, nails and cells. Additionally, the yolk contains vitamins A and B12, plus antioxidants, which work to ensure healthy eyes and choline to maintain an excellent cerebral system. Certain varieties of egg come with the added boon of high omega-3 levels (specifically, those chickens which have been fed a flaxseed-rich diet), which are good for your joints, skin, brain, heart and helps to lower bad cholesterol levels.

Whilst eggs can be eaten raw, using pasteurised eggs minimises the risk of salmonella. They are also more easily digestible when cooked, not to mention tastier! Frying, boiling and poaching are the most  common methods of cooking, and whilst the latter is probably the healthiest, the low-calorie, low-fat nature of the humble egg means any option is generally beneficial.

Is celery good for you?

A proud member of the Apiaceae family, celery is a leafy green vegetable, which counts among its cousins carrots, coriander, cumin and parsley. Celery is a great addition to any healthy diet – low in calories and a good way to add bulk to dishes.

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Is celery good for you?

A proud member of the Apiaceae family, celery is a leafy green vegetable, which counts among its cousins carrots, coriander, cumin and parsley. Celery is a great addition to any healthy diet – low in calories and a good way to add bulk to dishes.

As well as being great for weight loss due to its very low calorie count, celery also offers several other health benefits. It is rich in vitamins A and K, helping to maintain a healthy immune system and a trouble-free bloodstream. It is a great source of dietary fibre as well, aiding with digestion and helping to prevent ailments such as diabetes and heart disease.

Celery can also be used to treat minor everyday complaints, such head and muscle aches and pains and can easily be incorporated into salads, stir-fries and stews; not to mention Bloody Marys!

Is brown rice good for you?

Rice is the most commonly consumed foodstuff on the planet, and with year-round yields, it is always readily available and account for up to 50% of the calorific intake of half of the world.

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Is brown rice good for you?

Rice is the most commonly consumed foodstuff on the planet, and with year-round yields, it is always readily available and account for up to 50% of the calorific intake of half of the world.

Whilst brown and white share similar levels of carbohydrates and calories, they differ greatly in nutritional benefits. Brown rice receives a lot less treatment than white, with only the outer layer (or the ‘hull’) being removed in processing – this allows for the realisation of its maximum nutritional potential. It contains vitamins B1, B3 and B6, as well as iron, dietary fibre and other important minerals. Some of these are reintroduced into white rice artificially (such as vitamins B1 and B3); however, many are not, making brown rice a much healthier choice.

Brown rice is also an excellent source of manganese, providing 88% of our recommended intake in just one cup, helping produce energy and maintain an efficient nervous system. It also contains more than four times the amount of magnesium that white rice does, as well as rice bran oil, proven to reduce cholesterol.

Brown rice has a glycemic load per serving of 22, lower than white rice, which is 30.

Is broccoli good for you?

Not just tiny trees, broccoli is a member of the cruciferous vegetable family and is a fantastic source of many essential nutrients for your body’s wellbeing.

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is broccoli good for you?

Not just tiny trees, broccoli is a member of the cruciferous vegetable family and is a fantastic source of many essential nutrients for your body’s wellbeing.

Broccoli is a fantastic source of vitamin C and vitamin K, with just one serving of the green cabbage-like plant giving you your full recommended daily intake of both vitamins. It is also rich in phytonutrients, important for protecting against many types of cancer, including breast, colon and prostate. It is a very low calorific food, with around just 63 calories in every serving. Nevertheless it still offers appealing levels of fibre, minerals and antioxidants.

Steaming broccoli prior to eating increases its beneficial effects by helping it to fuse with your stomach acids and reduce cholesterol levels.

Are bananas good for you?

That curvy fruit that comes in distinctive yellow packaging, bananas are great for a instant energy boost and for providing key nutrients to a balanced diet.

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Are bananas good for you?

That curvy fruit that comes in distinctive yellow packaging, bananas are great for a instant energy boost and for providing key nutrients to a balanced diet.

Naturally free from sodium, fat and cholesterol, the banana is also fairly low in calories and so is an excellent addition to your morning routine. The potassium found in bananas helps to provide an energy boost – the reason why they’re so popular with sportsmen and women – whilst it also has very high levels of vitamins B6 and C. Bananas contain pectin, an antioxidant great for stabilising the digestive system, and their antacid content fights the risk of stomach ulcers, too.

Although bananas do not contain calcium, they do have fructooligosaccharide, a compound which works to help the body better absorb the bone building nutrient, and so indirectly help to maintain a healthy skeleton and teeth.